Friday, May 22, 2020

THE MAIN FEATURES OF THE METAPHYSICAL POETRY ...

THE MAIN FEATURES OF THE METAPHYSICAL POETRY ILLUSTRATED BY JOHN DONNE The term metaphysical poetry is used to describe a certain type of 17th century poetry. Metaphysical poetry is concerned with the whole experience of man. It means that the poetry is about showing knowledge and thoughts from different areas of experience, especially about love, romantic and sensual; about mans relationship with God and about pleasure, learning and art. Metaphysical poems are lyric poems characterised by use of wit, irony and wordplay. Wit and conceit were both aspects of a mental set shared by writers looking for connections between things. As well as manipulation of ideas, wit could be displayed†¦show more content†¦In his Holy Sonnets Donne investigates issues of eternity but also sin, repentance and death are things that have always forced people to examine their faith. Born into a Roman Catholic family, Donnes personal relationship with religion was strong and passionate and at the center of his poetry. In 1621 he became dean of Saint Pauls Cathedral. Later he wrote his private prayers Devotions upon Emergent Occasions and his learned, charismatic and inventive preaching made him a highly inluential presence in London. Only a few days before his death he preached Deaths Duel, a terrifying analysis of all life as a decline toward death and dissolution which contemporaries termed his own funeral sermon 3123 Generally Donne wrote about women in his youth, and about God in his older ages, his passion is transformed. In fact Donne is unusual, if not unique, for him courtly love hardly appears in his poetry at all. The courtly love poet always express the same experience of love, the range of situations and motions who deal with being very limited. In contrast Donne expresses an enormously wide range of feelings in his Songs and Sonnets, all relating to the experience of real love. In these poems we are also confronted by the war between the body and soul. The metaphysical style expresses a sense of the tensions between matter and spirit, faith and reason. However he also saw the necessity of realising that love is personal not merely spiritual relationship. We can say

Friday, May 8, 2020

Nanda and Warms, Bodley, Lee Study Guide - 1662 Words

Anthropology 03 Readings- Nanda and Warms: Chapters 1-3,5 Bodley: Chapters 1-2 Lee: entire book (including Appendix A and B) Videos: â€Å"First Contact† â€Å"Bushmen of the Kalahari† â€Å"N!ai† Topics: Concept of culture- The learned, symbolic, at least partially adaptive and ever-changing patterns of behavior and meaning shared by members of a group. - Almost all behavior is learned - Cultural norms and values are shared by people - All Cultures change Pidgin English- A simplified language that develops as a means of communication between two or more groups of people that do not have a language in common. (Masta- John Marshall, Bird- Airplane) - Pidgins develop when people who speak different languages come together.†¦show more content†¦They said that they finally have a white man of their own and why did it take so long for him to get there. They expected good things like gifts, and requested that if he have anything to give, give it to only them. Foraging and consequences- The Dobe were known to be hunters and gatherers and pursued their way of life without agriculture and hardly any domesticated animals They had to travel long distances to collect food as well as find animals to hunt. Once a hunted animal was hit, they had to track it. Because food was scarce, the Dobe people shared whatever food was collected with everyone. â€Å"Local knowledge† (Of Environment)- Dobe people know how to hunt and track animals. They know what to eat and what not to eat as well as how to get water. They also know at what times its best do things because climate is crucial Importance of kinship- Kinship is the central organizing principle of societies. - Only a short list of names for both men and women. - Names are inherited from ancestors and every child must be named for somebody - Children cannot be named after parents - Nicknames (Short, Tall) - Wii shows how a supposedly rigid family system can be flexible and allow change. Reciprocity- They share with everyone because it enhances their chances of

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Industrious, Meticulous Hardworker Free Essays

Hardware : Cisco router 7200, 2651, switches 3550, APC UPS System, 4006 HP Server ? Tools : Tacacs, Secute CRT, Wireshark ? Protocols : TCP/IP, OSPE, RIP,FTP and TFTP ? Database : SQL and MySQL ? Certification : OCP(Oracle Certified Professional) 1. ( Operating System: Windows 9x /XP,Dos 1. Languages: C, C++, Java, Visual Basic 1. We will write a custom essay sample on Industrious, Meticulous Hardworker or any similar topic only for you Order Now Database : MS Access, Oracle 9i 1. Web Tools: HTML EXPERIENCEDell (Technical Support Associate): Mar 2008 – Feb 2009: Technical support services offered to different clients of Dell, based in USA, for various Dell Hardware, Software and Internet based issues. Developed good understanding of pre implantation and post implementation issues for need to maintain uniform standard procedures for purchase and compatibility of software Vs hardware. Handled issues regarding resourcing for components and their impact on project time over run.Understood need for development of vendor base and building up of redundancy factors for new technologies. IBM (Sr. Technical Support Representative): Jun 2009 – Jul 2010: Provided IT support to IBM’s client Carphone Warehouse, UK and it’s partners. Joined as an entry level service desk agent, and moved on to the role of a 2nd Line agent during the course of my tenure, based on my performance. 2nd Line agents role, mainly dealt with providing solutions for issues, which were otherwise complex for service desk to resolve.This role involved handling calls, and web based tickets from branches of Carphone warehouse, spread across Europe and Germany. Performed mentoring tasks, and up-skilling new joiners in the organization. Queue monitoring activities undertaken to have a watch on metrics like AHT according to the client specified SLAs. Generating reports based on the metrics, required by managers, to analyze trends and emerging patterns, which would help reduce future redundancies. Providing quality feedbacks and advice to peers, thus enabling them to communicate effectively with customers. How to cite Industrious, Meticulous Hardworker, Papers

Tuesday, April 28, 2020

Should Racist Speech Enjoy Protection Under The First Amendment Essays

Should Racist Speech Enjoy Protection under the First Amendment Prejudice and racial stereotyping are two of this country's greatest problems today. Many people in our society have tried to find ways to eliminate or at least limit these types of behavior, but have met with very limited, if any, success. Because of the complex nature of racism and racist acts, coupled with the fact the first amendment prohibits the government from limiting the publics' right to free expression and speech, the Federal government has been ineffective in eliminating racist actions that pervade our society. State governments and institutions have attempted to set up their own laws condemning such actions, but have been wholly unsuccessful. Some of those waging a war on racism have established anti-discrimination policies, and have had these policies challenged as a result. Central Michigan University, for example, had instituted a discriminatory harassment policy, only to have it shot down by the Supreme Court in 1995 on grounds that the policy "necessarily requires [the] university to assess racial or ethnic content of speech." Since Central Michigan University is a State school, the First Amendment prohibits it from enacting regulations that would limit an individual's right to free speech unless the regulations, according to a 1986 ruling by the Supreme Court, are "narrowly and precisely designed." As you can imagine, precisely tailoring any statute in order to prohibit racist speech is nearly impossible - and as many other speakers have already said, banning the current racial slurs will only create new ones. Additionally, an outright ban on racist speech and ideas could likely lead to a higher level of violence in our society. A number of other supreme court rulings have come out in favor of protecting all speech, including racist speech, such as: A 1941 ruling on the case of Sullens v State, stating that the "Freedom of speech includes freedom to speak unwisdom or even heresy." A 1949 ruling on the case of Terminillo v Chicago, stating that "Attacks on racial and religious groups are protected by right of free speech in absence of showing of serious substantive evil that rises far above public inconvenience, annoyance, or unrest?" A 1952 ruling on the case of Joseph Burstyn, Inc. v Wilson, stating that: "[The] First Amendment prohibits [the] state from banning communication of ideas deemed by some to be blasphemous or sacrilegious." A 1965 ruling on the case of Cox v Louisiana, stating that "Freedom of speech is of paramount importance and may not be denied merely because it may create dispute." Thus with these rulings, and with the only notable exception being in the case of the utterance of "fighting words," which are defined as "words which by their very utterance inflict injury or tend to incite immediate breach of peace," racist speech is currently protected under the First Amendment. Some would argue, however, that any racial slur or racist speech has no place in today's society, and that the general public does not want to hear and should not be subjected to hearing such outright bigotry. But does the right to speak one's mind outweigh the listener's rights? Apparently, yes, it does. According to the supreme court in the case of the National Labor Relations Board v Montgomery Ward & Co. (1946), the "First Amendment is concerned with freedom of thought and expression of [the] speaker or writer, not with conditions under which [the] auditor receives [the] message? [the] First Amendment does not require that [an] audience shall have volunteered to listen." This ruling essentially invalidates the argument, and forces the listener into a position where he must decide what to listen to and what to ignore, which is what we all do anyway. Allowing racist speech is an important thing, though. Without it we would have no 'litmus test' available to test the racial tension in our country, and would therefore have no way to combat it. By allowing free speech to continue and by researching other methods of ending racism, we can get at the root of the problem and stop racism before it starts. The key is not to limit or control action, but rather to influence reason and thought. There are a number of

Thursday, March 19, 2020

s House

The Tarantella: Nora’s Dance of Death The ‘Incurable Disease’ in â€Å"A Doll’s House† Imagery and symbolism is a major and running theme in Ibsen’s play, â€Å"A Doll’s House.† In the third act, when Nora’s crisis is coming to a head, the black shawl, the dark lighting, her sense of inevitability and doom, the tarantella, all combine to make the play a nightmare descending into â€Å"incurable† disease and disaster for the heroine, Nora. She believes that she is a moral incurable, and in the end becomes the hero of the play, the only one willing to admit there is a problem, and to change it. She changes it the only way possible, that is, by leaving altogether the comfortable â€Å"Doll’s House† she has built and maintained for so long. Nora’s house reflects society and the way women were raised and trained, as â€Å"modern† women (at the time the play was written). Her upbringing, and her father’s faults, have combined to make her into a person with a hidden and ‘incurable’ disease: ignorance. Nora has been trained to get her way by manipulating men and using her charms to get what she needs. She has not been shown another way, as is a symptom of society’s treatment of women at that time. Nora discovers through her experiences that she must leave the situation and â€Å"find herself.† She must find her human side, and learn new, more honorable ways to survive and thrive in the man’s world she lives in. She must find self-respect. Nora’s humiliating ways of achieving her means have been dictated by her narrow view of the world. In the beginning of the play, she believes that her moral code, that of love and family, should be respected and even admired by outsiders. When she realizes that this is not the way the law views things, and even her husband would not approve, she becomes desperate to cover up her (now realized) terrible mistake. But when she made those mistakes, they were, in her ... 's House Free Essays on The Doll\'s House The Tarantella: Nora’s Dance of Death The ‘Incurable Disease’ in â€Å"A Doll’s House† Imagery and symbolism is a major and running theme in Ibsen’s play, â€Å"A Doll’s House.† In the third act, when Nora’s crisis is coming to a head, the black shawl, the dark lighting, her sense of inevitability and doom, the tarantella, all combine to make the play a nightmare descending into â€Å"incurable† disease and disaster for the heroine, Nora. She believes that she is a moral incurable, and in the end becomes the hero of the play, the only one willing to admit there is a problem, and to change it. She changes it the only way possible, that is, by leaving altogether the comfortable â€Å"Doll’s House† she has built and maintained for so long. Nora’s house reflects society and the way women were raised and trained, as â€Å"modern† women (at the time the play was written). Her upbringing, and her father’s faults, have combined to make her into a person with a hidden and ‘incurable’ disease: ignorance. Nora has been trained to get her way by manipulating men and using her charms to get what she needs. She has not been shown another way, as is a symptom of society’s treatment of women at that time. Nora discovers through her experiences that she must leave the situation and â€Å"find herself.† She must find her human side, and learn new, more honorable ways to survive and thrive in the man’s world she lives in. She must find self-respect. Nora’s humiliating ways of achieving her means have been dictated by her narrow view of the world. In the beginning of the play, she believes that her moral code, that of love and family, should be respected and even admired by outsiders. When she realizes that this is not the way the law views things, and even her husband would not approve, she becomes desperate to cover up her (now realized) terrible mistake. But when she made those mistakes, they were, in her ...

Tuesday, March 3, 2020

How Reporters Can Write Great Follow-up News Stories

How Reporters Can Write Great Follow-up News Stories Writing a single basic breaking news article is a pretty straightforward task. You start by writing your lede, which is based on the most important facts in the story. But many news stories are not simply one-time events but rather ongoing topics that can last for weeks or even months. One example would be a crime story that unfolds over time - the crime is committed, then police search for and finally arrest a suspect. Another example might be a long trial involving an especially complex or interesting case. Reporters must often do what is called follow-up articles for long-lasting topics such as these. The Lede The key to writing an effective follow-up story starts with the lede. You cant write the same lede every day for a story that continues over an extended period of time. Instead, you must construct a fresh lede each day, one that reflects the latest developments in the story. But while writing a lede that includes those latest developments, you also need to remind your readers what the original story was all about to begin with. So the follow-up story lede really combines new developments with some background material about the original story. An Example Lets say you cover a house fire in which several people are killed. Heres how your lede for the first story might read: Two people were killed last night when a fast-moving fire swept through their house. Now lets say several days have passed and the fire marshal tells you the fire was a case of arson. Heres your first follow-up lede: A house fire that killed two people earlier this week was deliberately set, the fire marshal announced yesterday. See how the lede combines important background from the original story - two people killed in the fire - with the new development - the fire marshal announcing that it was arson. Now lets take this story one step further. Lets say a week has passed and police have arrested a man who they say set the fire. Heres how your lede might go: Police yesterday arrested a man who they say set the fire last week that killed two people in a house. Get the idea? Again, the lede combines the most important information from the original story with the latest development. Reporters do follow-up stories this way so that readers who may not have read the original story can figure out what is going on and not be confused. The Rest of the Story The rest of the follow-up story should follow the same balancing act of combining the latest news with background information. Generally, the newer developments should be placed higher in the story, while the older information should be lower down. Heres how the first few paragraphs of your follow-up story about the arrest of the arson suspect might go: Police yesterday arrested a man who they say set the fire last week that killed two people in a house. Police said Larson Jenkins, 23, used rags soaked with gasoline to set the fire at the house that killed his girlfriend, Lorena Halbert, 22, and her mother, Mary Halbert, 57. Detective Jerry Groenig said Jenkins was apparently angry because Halbert had recently broken up with him. The fire started around 3 a.m. last Tuesday and quickly swept through the house. Lorena and Mary Halbert were pronounced dead at the scene. No one else was injured. Again, the latest developments are placed high in the story. But they are always tied to background from the original event. This way, even a reader learning about this story for the first time will easily understand what has happened.

Sunday, February 16, 2020

Business Environment Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 words - 2

Business Environment - Essay Example These elements may include leadership and management, clientele, technological factors, rules and regulations of a government, competition, financial planning. In addition, marketing strategies, demand and supply within the area of business, the economic inclinations are other factors that influence the business environment (McNamara 1999). Therefore, the is a distinction in both the purpose and objectives of different types of organizations within any business environment. This determines whether the organization is profit or nonprofit based (McNamara 1999). Profit organizations have the sole purpose of generating profits, such that the amount of money the organization is taking out should be less than the amount of money the organization is taking in (McNamara 1999). In addition, the organization leaders or owners may opt to hold s larger portion of the returns after deducting all the expenses such as salaries and benefits to employees, bills, among others (McNamara 1999). Addition ally, in the profit organizations, the management may choose to cut back on running costs in order to maximize profits. For example, the organization may choose to cut back on personnel in case the management feels that they do not require as much personal or in case they want to incorporate more technological advancements (McNamara 1999). In general, the management has the overall decision making capacity and formulate plans that enable the organization maximize on its returns as it acquires its market share within the economic sector. As a result, marketing strategies become vital for profit organizations as its main goal is to maximize its returns through reaching to a larger clientele (McNamara 1999). Examples of profit organization include Coca Cola, Microsoft, Apple, Samsung, among others. On the other hand, the sole purpose of nonprofit organizations is to benefit the society. They are mostly created for specific tasks such as religious, educational, or charitable (Carter 200 8). For the sole purpose of nonprofit organizations is to serve the community, they operate under strict rules and regulations that ban the owners of the organization from taking the profits for their own gain. This means that, nonprofit organizations have laws that allow them to operate some business activities although the proceeds obtained are to benefit the community (McNamara 1999). Therefore, the profits obtained from the business activities is recirculates into the organization in order for it to achieve its mission and objectives for the community (Carter 2008). Therefore, nonprofit organizations not only run some business activities but they obtain their funding from donations from the public or grants from other organizations. The examples of nonprofit organizations include research institutes, foundations, public schools, public universities, museums, public hospitals, professional associations, among others (Justia 2013). Typical real world examples include Red Cross, UN , (Justia 2013). Any organization, whether profit or nonprofit formulated objectives and missions targeting a particular group or clientele. Therefore, any organization has responsibilities to reach their targets. For instance, in case the organization is profit based, then its responsibilities will vary from making sure of the